We Need to Talk About Justice League

There’s a pivotal moment in Justice League where a weary Bruce Wayne champions Diana to lead the team, not him. The film wants to prove otherwise (THE LEAGUE NEEDS BATMAN). Thing is, the idea isn’t half bad. Wonder Woman is a far more efficient warrior; her steadfastness not only gets the job done, it saves Batman’s life. The film wants its team and its hierarchy, the same way Warner Bros. wants an Avengers-level success (so much so they brought in Joss Whedon). But there is no need for either aside from the machine-churning mentality of the studio blockbuster and a larger, interconnected universe – the new norm in franchise filmmaking. 2017 pushed the superhero into its golden age with stellar entries in the genre, making Justice League the sole casualty of the bunch.  Continue reading

‘Logan’: A History of Violence

“There are no more guns in the valley,” Laura says in her eulogy. She and her band of mutants are no longer on the run, but their safety, much like their hopes of a future, come at a cost. The line is a reference to the 1953 Western Shane, a film that operates as key thematic influence in Logan; a film within a film. Logan itself is a film within a larger film universe (and an ever-expanding Marvel brand), which, like it’s overt film referencing, is all but impossible to ignore. Logan stands tall as an outlier, doing away with end-of-the-world plots, superhero team-ups, and allusions to future installments, servicing an even greater payoff that not only honors its comic book origins, but transcends them.  Continue reading

‘Captain America: Civil War’ Review: A Superhero Smackdown for the Ages

heroes-captain-america-civil-war-slice-600x200“I can do this all day,” Steve Rogers once said in the face of adversity. The words are a measure of his resolve and his unflinching determination to do the right thing. Rogers has indeed come a long way from holding a trashcan lid in that alleyway. Those same words get a nostalgic repeat in Civil War, but is tinged with loss and heartbreak. Because Rogers isn’t facing a bully anymore, but a friend. So what does doing the right thing mean if your own friend is in the way? Where do you compromise, if at all? And how long can you keep fighting until something breaks for good?  Continue reading

‘Daredevil’ Season 2 Review: “One Batch, Two Batch”

Daredevil-temporada-2Vigilante justice is a double-edged sword. How can one bring justice to others when it requires breaking the law themselves? Such is what continually plagues Matt Murdock as he suits up as an attorney by day, and Daredevil by night. But the more foreboding question is where do you draw the line? As Matt put it so eloquently in season 1, “Sometimes the difference between good and evil is a sharp line.” How many laws can you break until you become the very criminal you’re trying to stop? Who is to stop you then?  Continue reading

‘Jessica Jones’ Review: Noir under a Superhero Alias

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“The big green guy,” “the flag guy”; Earth’s mightiest heroes are casually dismissed by Jessica and her colleagues like bums on the street. This apathy suits the world of Jessica Jones just fine. It’s the same world that’s still trying to make sense of the Invasion of New York, and a world that is now fully aware of such people with extraordinary gifts. The refreshing part about Jessica Jones, however, is how its central characters are struggling to remain ordinary in the light of so much unabashed heroism.  Continue reading